New Project Aims to Set Effectiveness Guidelines for Hemophilia Gene Therapy Trials

New Project Aims to Set Effectiveness Guidelines for Hemophilia Gene Therapy Trials

An international team has joined efforts to establish guidelines for effectiveness and outcome measurements regarding gene therapies in hemophilia.

The CoreHEM project will be led by researchers from McMaster University in Ontario, Canada, in collaboration with the National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF) in the U.S. and the Green Park Collaborative — a major initiative of the Center for Medical Technology Policy (CMTP), based in Baltimore, Maryland.

“With a growing pipeline of gene therapy products for hemophilia, it is an ideal time for this work,” Sean Tunis, president and CEO of CMTP, said in a news release. “This effort will potentially serve as a model for achieving consensus around outcomes to demonstrate effectiveness and value for promising emerging therapies in many other clinical areas, as well as for other rare conditions.”

Hemophilia is caused by a genetic defect that leads to low levels or the total absence of clotting factors — factor VIII in hemophilia A and factor IX in hemophilia B — which are necessary for effective bleeding control. Hemophilia patients need to receive routine injections of the missing clotting factors to control symptoms of the disease. This demanding therapy schedule can have an extreme impact on patients’ quality of life.

Scientific advances have led to the development of new treatments that may have the potential to cure hemophilia A and B by replacing the damaged gene. Clinical trials on these new gene therapies should provide enough evidence demonstrating their effectiveness, but also substantial improvements in reducing or eliminating burdens of the disease.

The CoreHEM project aims to define a core outcome, set through a consensus process, which should be considered when evaluating the effectiveness of gene therapies in patients with hemophilia.

Taking into consideration input from patients, clinicians, researchers, product manufacturers, public and private payers, and U.S. and international government agencies, the team will create a list of potential outcome domains and measurement approaches that will be reviewed by a steering committee.

This list will go through an online Delphi voting process and an in-person consensus meeting to prioritize and condense the list into the final core outcome set.

“These breakthroughs have the potential to be life-changing,” said Val Bias, CEO of the National Hemophilia Foundation. “This collaborative effort will bring a much needed voice from our patients, and the important role they play in identifying outcomes that are vital to their health.”

The final results of the CoreHEM project, expected early in 2018, will be published in a peer-reviewed article providing recommendations for important patient outcomes in clinical studies focused on gene therapies for hemophilia. In addition, an “effectiveness guidance document” will also be published.

Implementing these outcome-defined measures will not only help patients and clinicians to make better treatment-related decisions, but will also potentially improve the way clinical trials are conducted and assessed.

“The enthusiasm from so many stakeholders to becoming part of the project speaks volumes to the potential of this initiative,” said Alfonso Iorio, co-principal investigator and associate professor of health research methods, evidence, and impact at McMaster University.

Creating a consensus for implementation early in the development of breakthrough technology is a key to success, he added.

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