One-word Resolutions for the New Year

One-word Resolutions for the New Year

I am already looking forward to 2019. The first half of 2018 was not filled with joy, but fortunately, the last six months have been pretty wonderful. Part of this has been Caeleb’s new treatment with Hemlibra (emicizumab-kxwh). It has truly changed our lives. His quality of life has improved by over 100 percent. It is a miracle.

How in the world can 2019 be better? I do not believe in New Year’s resolutions. I have tried too many times to better myself, only to fail by Jan. 5. So, I’ve adopted a new way of approaching the New Year. I select a single word as my focus. Some of my previous words have been “intention,” “hope,” “joy,” “enough,” “change,” and “flourish.” I find that having one word as my focus gives me many different ways to be successful.

Consider where you are in the midst of your bleeding disorder. How can things be better in the near future? Are you looking forward to a change in your treatment? What about your quality of life? Maybe you are about to embrace some activities as a catalyst for bigger changes to your health. This is the time of year to start considering how you can move toward having a healthier year.

One of the biggest concerns for people is their weight. Having a bleeding disorder and being overweight is not a good combination. Instead of declaring, “I will lose 50 pounds in 2019,” perhaps you can focus on the word “change” and begin to shift your eating habits slowly. This way, no matter how many pounds you have lost or gained, you can reflect on your word and the habits you associate with your goal. Or maybe your health goal is more focused on exercise. Instead of getting to the gym or going out for a walk once a week, incorporate a second walk into your routine to get you started on a new path.

There are numerous ways to be successful in caring for your bleeding disorder. This may be the year you begin to help your young teen transition to be more independent by ordering their factor and supplies. It could be as simple as making him aware of the importance of keeping his inventory of supplies well stocked. How about your older teens who drive? Are they wearing a MedicAlert ID? Do they understand the importance of wearing this symbol?

Change, empowerment, success: my suggestions for your “one word” for 2019. Perhaps your family can choose a word for all of you to embrace for a healthy 2019. There is no right or wrong way to begin the New Year. But if you take some time, with thoughtful contemplation, you can set yourself up for a stellar New Year.

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Note: Hemophilia News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Hemophilia News Today or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to hemophilia.

Cazandra Campos-MacDonald is a motivational speaker, writer and patient advocate for families with bleeding disorders. She blogs about the journey of her two sons with severe hemophilia and inhibitors and has written articles and blog posts for numerous publications. Cazandra’s older brother, Ronaldo Julian Campos, died of complications from hemophilia as an infant. She lives with her family, Rev. Joe MacDonald, Julian (22) and Caeleb (13) in Farwell, Texas. Her book, “Dear Hemophilia” will be coming out in October 2019. You may follow her blogs and view her TEDxABQ talk at www.cazandramacdonald.com.
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Cazandra Campos-MacDonald is a motivational speaker, writer and patient advocate for families with bleeding disorders. She blogs about the journey of her two sons with severe hemophilia and inhibitors and has written articles and blog posts for numerous publications. Cazandra’s older brother, Ronaldo Julian Campos, died of complications from hemophilia as an infant. She lives with her family, Rev. Joe MacDonald, Julian (22) and Caeleb (13) in Farwell, Texas. Her book, “Dear Hemophilia” will be coming out in October 2019. You may follow her blogs and view her TEDxABQ talk at www.cazandramacdonald.com.

One comment

  1. Medical IDs are definitely recommended for anyone living with a medical condition, including bleeding disorders. Organizations like the Hemophilia Foundation of America believes that medical IDs are a critical component to the overall health and safety of a person with bleeding disorder.

    We hope that people make this year the year that they start to wear a medical ID for their own health, safety, and peace of mind.

    Happy New Year!

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