30 Ways to Find Hope in Dark Spaces

30 Ways to Find Hope in Dark Spaces
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Feeling hopeless? Wondering how you will possibly find the energy to go on? Wanting to smash your alarm clock, pull your covers over your head, and hide in your bed all day long? You are not alone.

Coping with hemophilia day in and day out, as a patient or a caretaker, can be draining emotionally and physically. It is easy to feel like we are drowning in a sea of medical terminology, endless doctors’ appointments, and continuous injuries.

When we are stuck in the middle of a maze, sometimes we must pause to find our way out. Taking a moment to regroup affords us an opportunity to see the larger picture and renew our energy so we can persevere.

We may fantasize about running away. Hawaii sounds nice, doesn’t it? But running away may not be an option. This means we must find methods of escape that we can incorporate into our daily lives.

Thankfully, there are many small things we can do every day that allow us to refuel so we can continue to swim through the daily responsibilities of life with hemophilia.

Following are some ways to decompress and refuel when you feel overwhelmed:

  1. Take a bubble bath. If you do not have a bath, a warm shower is nice, too!
  2. Make yourself a cup of soothing tea or comforting coffee or hot chocolate. (If you watched “The Big Bang Theory,” you may remember that Sheldon was taught to offer a warm beverage to anyone in need of comforting!)
  3. Take a walk.
  4. Go for a drive.
  5. Talk it out with someone you trust.
  6. Plant seeds in a garden, then water them and watch them grow. 
  7. Prepare your favorite comfort food.
  8. Read a good book.
  9. Watch a feel-good movie.
  10. Yell as loud as you can. (If you need a reason to yell, watch a sports game or ride a roller coaster!)
  11. Play with puppies and kittens.
  12. Have a conversation with a good friend.
  13. Spread love: Give gifts to others, bake cookies for your neighbors, or share bouquets of flowers from your home garden.
  14. Create a “Little Free Library.”
  15. Go geocaching.
  16. Release your feelings by journaling.
  17. Do 30 minutes of aerobic exercise.
  18. Raise money for a cause you support.
  19. Take a nap.
  20. Plan a girls’ night (in person with social distancing or via Zoom).
  21. Start a craft project: Knit, quilt, scrapbook, or build something from wood.
  22. Rip up a phone book. (That can be oddly satisfying!)
  23. Hug a teddy bear.
  24. Give someone a bear hug!
  25. Smell flowers.
  26. Wear your favorite scented perfume or cologne.
  27. Plan a vacation.
  28. Send a letter or postcard to a friend.
  29. Meet people who also have hemophilia and network with them.
  30. Remind yourself that this is one moment in time, and this moment will pass.

You are worth it. Take the time to care for yourself. Renewing your energy will make a huge difference in your ability to stay healthy and strong.

You’ve got this.

***

Note: Hemophilia News Today is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or another qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Hemophilia News Today or its parent company, BioNews, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to hemophilia.

Shellye Horowitz is a licensed school counselor and school administrator with over 25 years of experience in education. Shellye has strong ties to the bleeding disorders community with six traceable generations of hemophilia A in her family. As a woman with hemophilia, Shellye feels fortunate to have obtained a correct diagnosis and access to care, albeit later in life. Her desire is to spread awareness that women also have hemophilia and need appropriate and equitable care. Shellye lives in Northern California, where she and her dog, “Hope,” love to play on the beach and wander through the majestic Redwood forests.
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Shellye Horowitz is a licensed school counselor and school administrator with over 25 years of experience in education. Shellye has strong ties to the bleeding disorders community with six traceable generations of hemophilia A in her family. As a woman with hemophilia, Shellye feels fortunate to have obtained a correct diagnosis and access to care, albeit later in life. Her desire is to spread awareness that women also have hemophilia and need appropriate and equitable care. Shellye lives in Northern California, where she and her dog, “Hope,” love to play on the beach and wander through the majestic Redwood forests.
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  • self-care, hope, forums, myths
  • self-care, hope, forums, myths
  • self-care, hope, forums, myths
  • self-care, hope, forums, myths

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